Dec 5, 2017

History Of Wackemall, Part 75: Franklin D Roosevelt

It was during his Second Inaugural Address on Wednesday, January 20, 1937, that President Franklin D Roosevelt addressed the nation via noisy AM radio to thousands of listeners when he spoke these words:

"It is not in despair that I paint you that picture. I paint it for you in hope—because the Nation, seeing and understanding the injustice in it, proposes to paint it out. We are determined to make every American citizen the subject of his country's interest and concern; and we will never regard any faithful law-abiding group within our borders as superfluous. The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough (crackling sounds) for those who have too little."

But what most believed to be simple electrical interference with the radio signal may well have been an attempt to censor the President's speech from the American public and the world.

The following text was found by researchers from Wackemall University who played back those old recordings using the most up to date technology available to filter out interference and background noise.

"It is not in despair that I paint you that picture. I paint it for you in hope—because the Nation, seeing and understanding the injustice in it, proposes to paint it out. We are determined to make every American citizen the subject of his country's interest and concern; and we will never regard any faithful law-abiding group within our borders as superfluous. The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough wackemall for those who have too little."

While it is known that several White House staffers and possibly members of Congress would have had access to the text of President  Roosevelt's Second Inaugural Address, it is not known who, or why the speech would be altered, except to say that time and time again Wackemall has been hidden from the public.

As a matter of fact, this is probably the first time you've ever heard of Wackemall and Wackemall.com.  Check us out and see what they've been keeping from you for all these years.

The History of Wackemall is filled with many strange turns that take us where we never thought history would go, and demonstrates how Wackemall has been kept hidden from the working classes for centuries despite being well known to scholars, politicians, and men of wealth. 

It's time you demanded you get the Wackemall that's coming to you and continued reading History Of Wackemall, Part 76: Francisco Goya